Royal Enfield Scram 411

A spin on: Royal Enfield’s Scram 411

Royal Enfield’s mini adventure bike, the Himalayan, has been an incredible success story even by Enfield standards, becoming the UK’s second best-selling adventure bike (behind BMW’s all-conquering GS) – and the Scram 411 builds on that success, adding sharper styling and better road manners. Bob Pickett gets up close…

Royal Enfield Scram 411

Give me some spec

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A 411cc single-cylinder air-cooled engine putting out 24bhp @ 6,500rpm with 23.6lb-ft torque @ 4,250rpm resides in a half-duplex split-cradle frame. Seat height is 795mm; the Scram weighs in at a slender 185kg (dry).  Stopping power comes from a single 300mm, 2-piston calliper front disc with a 240mm single piston floating calliper rear.

Changes from the Himalayan?

Front wheel reduced from 21 to 19-inch (but broader profile); front geometry altered; a softer seat; the ABS is permanently on. The rest of its DNA is shared with its dual-purpose elder sibling.

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Royal Enfield Scram 411

What is it like to ride?

The Scram is relatively tall (795mm seat), but so narrow I get both feet flat despite my infamously short (29”) legs.

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First twist of the throttle, the Scram pulls gently, giving no indication of what happens as I select second. Enfield geared the 411cc single for low torque and midrange. Quickly past 40 in second, third takes you to 60 easily;up here things smooth out by moving up the 5-speed box, aided by the light clutch and precise gearbox. The Scram tops out at 80, but even in the 60s overtakes are possible.

Royal Enfield Scram 411

The Scram’s trump card is handling.  A 10mm reduction in front fork travel and smaller 19-inch (from 21) front tyre makes the Scram agile; heading on to a roundabout it nimbly flicked round with more ground clearance than you’d ever exploit, aided by the surprisingly sticky, semi-knobbly tyres. Pushing into bends at speed does challenge the suspension; leaning into a swooping bend at 60 the Scram gave a little shake. Not a worry, just letting me know we’re pushing the comfort zone.

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The suspension is deliberately soft (made to handle Indian roads). To me it performed well. I deliberately took it on bumpy surfaces, all soaked up. A road close to home has raised speed bumps.  On any other bike I’d ride round them. On the Scram, I rode over a few at 20/25 and it just bounced over, unflustered. It’s well balanced, and staying upright in built-up traffic requires no effort.

Royal Enfield Scram 411

It sips fuel, suggesting a range north of 250 miles, possible with the comfortable new soft saddle. I fidgeted after 90 minutes in the saddle, a reasonable time to take a break.

Clocks are simple with bags of information. I didn’t use the Tripper navigation system given the short loan (it doubles as a clock when not in use). Mirrors give good feedback (until obscured by vibration). Brakes? Decent feel and enough stopping power.

Would I own a Scram? Yes. It will do weekday chore riding with ease, but has more than enough in reserve to put a smile on your face. It’s a real case of the whole being much more than the sum of the parts.

Royal Enfield Scram 411

How much does it cost?

The base machine retails at £4599 (£100 more for flashier colours)

Want to try one?

To test this bike, contact:

East London Kawasaki/Bacons Motorcycles

737-741 Eastern Avenue

Ilford, Essex IG2 7RT

Tel: 020 8252 6020

www.baconsmotorcycles.co.uk

#morebikes #motorcycles #motorcycle #royalenfield #scram

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